Programme

20 September 2017

Hammersmith Campus

Wolfson Education Centre

Programme

12pm

Cafeteria

Lunch and registration

1pm

LT2

Welcome by Prof. Simone Di Giovanni

Prof. James Stirling, Provost - Vision for Imperial Neuroscience

1.30pm

LT2

Prof. David Nutt - Why neuroscientists should also be revolutionaries

2.30pm

LT2

How can the Postdoc and Fellows Development Centre support early career neuroscientists?

2.45pm

Cafeteria

Coffee Break

3.00pm

LT2

Panel discussion moderated by Grace Lindsay

Because we can! Is technology driving neuroscience?

Prof. Sophie Scott - Dr. Daniel Margulies - Dr. Christine Aicardi - Prof. Michael Häusser

4.30pm

Cafeteria

Open floor - Posters, Demos, Interactive networking

6pm

Cafeteria

Wine and cheese

 

Professor James Stirling CBE FRS FCGI became the first Provost of Imperial College London in August 2013. After completing a PhD in Theoretical Physics at Peterhouse, Cambridge, he undertook periods of research in the USA, Cambridge and at CERN in Geneva. During his career he became the first Director of the new Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP), served as the first Chair of the PPARC Science Committee and was appointed Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research at Durham University. He held this post for three years before moving to Cambridge to take up the Jacksonian Professorship as Head of the Cavendish Laboratory in 2008.

In recognition of his contribution to particle physics research he was elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society in May 1999 and in 2006 he was awarded a CBE in the New Year’s Honours list for services to science. In 2015 he was awarded a Fellowship of the City & Guilds of London Institute in recognition of his professional and personal achievements.

 

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David Nutt DM FRCP FRCPsych FMedSci is currently the Edmund J Safra Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology and Head of the Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology in the Division of Brain Science, Imperial College London. He is also visiting professor at the Open University in the UK and Maastricht University in the Netherlands. He is currently President of the European Brain Council and Chair of the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs and has previously been President of the British Neuroscience Association, the British Association of Psychopharmacology and the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology as well as Chair of the UK Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs. He is a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Physicians, of Psychiatrists and of the Academy of Medical Sciences. He is also the UK Director of the European Certificate and Masters in Affective Disorders courses and a member of the International Centre for Science in Drug Policy.

David broadcasts widely to the general public both on radio and television including BBC science and public affairs programmes on therapeutic as well as illicit drugs, their harms and their classification.

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Sophie Scott is a Wellcome Senior Research Fellow in Basic Biomedical Science & Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience in the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London. She is interested in the neural basis of vocal communication - how our brains process the information in speech and voices, and how our brains control the production of our voice. Within this, she am interested in the roles of streams of processing in auditory cortex, hemispheric asymmetries, and the interaction of speech processing with attentional and working memory factors. She is also interested in the expression of emotion in the voice. Finally, she is interested in individual differences in speech perception, and plasticity in speech perception, since these are important factors for people with cochlear implants.

 

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Daniel Margulies leads the Neuroanatomy and Connectivity Group at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany.

His research investigates the organization of large-scale brain networks, primarily through the analysis of intrinsic activity as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). He has developed approaches to define subregions within complex cortical areas, conducted cross-species comparative neuroanatomical studies, and related variation in these networks to phenotypic differences across individuals. His current research addresses the emergence of network topography and its relationship to cortical structure

 

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Christine Aicardi is Senior Research Fellow in Prof. Nikolas Rose's Foresight Laboratory, in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at King’s College London, contributing social scientific research to the Ethics and Society programme of the Human Brain Project. Christine worked for many years in the Information and Communication Technologies industry before returning to higher education to pursue a MSc then a PhD in Science and Technology Studies. Before joining the Human Brain Project, she was a Wellcome Library Research Fellow, working on a sociological history project focused on the neuroscientific part of the late Francis Crick’s career. Her long-standing research interests are the contemporary history of the sciences and technologies of brain and mind; the social studies of interdisciplinary practices and collaborations; and increasingly, the politics of memory in science.

 

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Michael Häusser is Professor of Neuroscience at University College London and a Principal Research Fellow of the Wellcome Trust. He received his PhD from Oxford University under the supervision of Julian Jack. He subsequently worked with Bert Sakmann at the Max-Planck-Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg and with Philippe Ascher at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris. He established his own laboratory at UCL in 1997 and became Professor of Neuroscience in 2001. He is interested in understanding the cellular basis of neural computation in the mammalian brain using a combination of experiments and theory, with a special focus on the role of dendrites.

 

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Grace Lindsay is a PhD candidate at the Center for Theoretical Neuroscience at Columbia University, where her research focuses on computational models of visual attention. Prior to that, she obtained a BS in Neuroscience from the University of Pittsburgh and worked as a research fellow at the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience in Freiburg, Germany. In addition to doing research, she is also a co-host of Unsupervised Thinking, a podcast on neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and science more broadly.